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Our experts are here to help you with broad range of topics.

Assessing your horse’s body condition score

Assessing your horse’s body condition score
‘Condition’ is a term used to describe muscle development but unfortunately, many people get confused about the difference between good muscle t..

Colic Part 1: Types of Colic

Colic Part 1: Types of Colic
Colic is a term used to describe abdominal pain and is the most common disorder occurring in the gastrointestinal tract. The signs of colic vary en..

Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS)

Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS)
What is EGUS? The term Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) was first used in 1999 to describe erosive and ulcerative diseases of the stomach in th..

Feeding the Good-Doer

Feeding the Good-Doer
Is my horse overweight? Determining whether your horse is overweight isn’t always easy. You see them every day so it can be difficult to spot the..

Maintaining Horses Condition Throughout Winter

Maintaining Horses Condition Throughout Winter
Winter has officially arrived! The longer nights, plummeting temperatures and wet conditions mean that caring for our horses is more challenging and t..

Electrolyte Loss, Head Stress and Dehydration

Electrolyte Loss, Head Stress and Dehydration
All muscular contraction creates heat, be it walking around the field grazing, or running a race. Some of this heat is stored by the body for bodily f..

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Nia O’Malley
Louise Jones – UK
Lorraine Fradl
Rebecca Watson
Nichola Reynolds – UK
Kirsty McCann – International

Frequently asked questions

Grass can provide horses that are at rest or in light work with sufficient calories, and even protein, to meet their daily requirements. However, even the very best grazing will not provide optimal levels of all the essential minerals. For example, horses at pasture, with no supplementary feed, can be deficient in both zinc and copper. This can result in problems such as poor hoof and coat condition. Horses that maintain weight easily on grazing alone will not need large quantities of concentrates and so a low intake, nutrient-rich balancer (i.e. Connolly’s Red Mills Performa Care or GroCare Balancer) is ideal. Horses in moderate to hard work have increased nutrient requirements. However, there isn’t sufficient capacity in the digestive system, or hours in the day, to consume enough grass to meet these requirements. Therefore, as workload increases, so does the need for concentrate feed. Feeding a suitable concentrate ration will ensure that horses in frequent work receive the additional calories, protein and micronutrients needed to support performance.
The best way to know how much a scoop of your feed holds is to weigh it! You can buy a spring balance or use kitchen scales. Put a scoop of your feed into a plastic bag and place it on the spring balance or the scales and weigh it accurately. As a rule, a scoop of cubes will weigh more than a similar scoop of mix. On average a round Stubbs scoop of cubes will weigh approximately 2.0kg whereas a scoop of mix will weigh approximately 1.5kg. These weights are only guidelines and will vary with the type of feed and whether you provide a level or heaped scoop. Weighing your scoop of feed is advisable in order to follow the manufacturer’s feeding guidelines correctly.
A horse’s diet should always be based on forage, whether fresh (i.e. grass) or preserved (i.e. haylage or hay). Most horses require between 2-3% of their bodyweight as dry food per day. If your horse needs to lose weight it may be necessary to restrict their total daily dry matter intake slightly. However, you should always speak to your vet before limiting your horse’s forage intake as, if not managed correctly, this can increase the risk of serious digestive and health problems. Some of your horse’s daily ration will be provided as hard feed (concentrates), but ideally as much as possible should be forage. When calculating the amount of forage your horse needs, it’s also important to remember that even preserved forage contains some water, for example hay usually contains around 15% moisture, so 1kg of hay actually provides 0.85kg of dry matter. As most horses are turned out for at least part of their day determining the exact amount of preserved forage they need, if any, can be difficult. As a guide, if your horse is never turned out, or is turned out only for few hours, then the entire forage portion of the diet should be provided as conserved forage. However, for horses that spend 50% of their time at grass, or that are permanently out on a semi-starvation paddock, this can be reduced by half.
Expert Advice Sport Horse

Feeding the Showjumper

Feeding the Showjumper
Showjumpers require power, strength and speed. Although many factors, including genetics, fitness and training, can influence your horse’s p..
Expert Advice Breeding, Feeding

Feeding the Stallion to Maximise Performance and Fertility

Feeding the Stallion to Maximise Performance and Fertility
Good nutrition and a well-balanced diet play a key role in maintaining a stallion in top health and condition in order to maximise performance and fer..
Expert Advice Breeding, Feeding

Step by step guide to mare and foal nutrition

Step by step guide to mare and foal nutrition
Late gestation, birth, and a foal’s early days can potentially shape its future health and performance for the rest of its life.  This period can b..
Expert Advice Breeding, Feeding

Feeding the Young Foal and Weanling

Feeding the Young Foal and Weanling
That time of year is upon us again. Having only just barely caught our breath after an incredibly busy stud season, breeders and owners now must look ..